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DC Comics Just Assembled Its Own Legends Of Tomorrow

DC Comics has unleashed its own version of the Legends of Tomorrow in the Generations: Shattered one-shot – can they save time itself?

DC Comics Just Assembled Its Own Legends Of Tomorrow
DC Comics Just Assembled Its Own Legends Of Tomorrow

DC Comics has assembled its own version of the Legends of Tomorrow. The CW has never been too concerned with comic book accuracy, and in 2016 they introduced a superhero team called the Legends of Tomorrow. No comic book equivalent had ever existed, and that meant viewers had absolutely no idea what to expect.

What they got was one of the zaniest, trippiest superhero stories of all time. The basic concept is a fairly simple one; the Legends of Tomorrow are a mismatched bunch of heroes plucked from different points in the timestream, and their job is to ensure history runs on track. The roster is constantly shifting, and the enemies range from time travelers to mystics to demons, meaning this is one show that can literally go anywhere and anywhen. Legends of Tomorrow can drift from futuristic sci-fi to supernatural near-horror in the space of a few minutes, taking full advantage of its time travel plot device. And now, in DC’s Generations: Shattered, the comic book publisher has assembled its own version of The CW’s team.

Written by Dan Jurgens, Andy Schmidt and Robert Venditti, and featuring art from a whole host of top talents, the book sees an unwitting time traveler named Kamandi leap through history attempting to recruit the necessary heroes to prevent all time and space from being destroyed. His mission goes terribly wrong, and as a result he winds up with a completely mismatched crew who are frankly ill-suited to the task. He saves Superboy from the Legion of Super Heroes when he was meant to pick up Brainiac-5 for his intelligence. Kamandi recruits Steel and Doctor Light in his place, though he misses Superman and winds up with Booster Gold instead. Starfire is picked up for raw power, Sinestro is collected from the days when he was a Green Lantern, and an alternate-universe Batman rounds out the team. It’s every bit as mismatched as any of Legends of Tomorrow’s crews. Unfortunately, however, their mission looks as though it could well be beyond their capabilities.

DC Comics Just Assembled Its Own Legends Of Tomorrow
DC Comics Just Assembled Its Own Legends Of Tomorrow

Time itself is breaking apart, and in truth none of these heroes possess the requisite skills and abilities to put matters right. But, to be fair, that is exactly what one would expect from the comic book equivalent of Legends of Tomorrow, because The CW’s show is always a sort of “David and Goliath” tale of an unlikely bunch somehow succeeding against all the odds.

It’s currently unclear how Generations: Shattered ties in to DC Comics’ Future State initiative, although the publisher has insisted it will somehow be intertwined. Hopefully Kamandi’s amusing team will become a permanent fixture once the dust has settled from whatever is going on – as the comic book version of the Legends of Tomorrow.

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Emma. (2020) on DVD For Sale

Emma. (2020) on DVD

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Emma: 7 Reasons The 2020 Movie Is Better Than The Gwyneth Paltrow Version (& 3 Paltrow’s Is Better)

Jane Austen’s Emma has seen many interpretations, including Gwyneth Paltrow’s 1996 and the most recent 2020 version. Which one is the best?

At the height of “Austenmania” in the ’90s, when a stream of films adapting Jane Austen novels occurred, “Emma” was turned into no less than 3 productions; a mini-series starring Kate Beckinsale, a modern retelling starring Alicia Silverstone (Clueless), and the most celebrated version starring Gwyneth Paltrow (incidentally during “Paltrowmania” as well).

2020 VERSION: ART DIRECTION

Emma: 7 Reasons The 2020 Movie Is Better Than The Gwyneth Paltrow Version (& 3 Paltrow's Is Better)
Emma: 7 Reasons The 2020 Movie Is Better Than The Gwyneth Paltrow Version (& 3 Paltrow’s Is Better)

Viewers familiar with the punchy colors of Marie Antoinette or similar films will appreciate the vivid pigments found throughout the 2020 version of Emma. Though the art direction can at times feel too self-aware, it creates a much more memorable visual experience than the 1996 version (or many recent period films).

Director Autumn de Wilde has intimated that in many period films, clothing and environments will often “already feel antique”, whereas historically, the color was how one’s wealth was flaunted to the world. Emma’s place in society is often established throughout the film by bright flashes of color, and it makes for a dazzling, kaleidoscopic narrative.

PALTROW’S VERSION: WORLD-BUILDING

Emma: 7 Reasons The 2020 Movie Is Better Than The Gwyneth Paltrow Version (& 3 Paltrow's Is Better)
Emma: 7 Reasons The 2020 Movie Is Better Than The Gwyneth Paltrow Version (& 3 Paltrow’s Is Better)

From the very opening scenes, the 1996 version immerses you in Emma’s world. An authoritative narrator is established, which guides viewers through the many social shenanigans. This mimics the satirical nature of author Jane Austen’s voice which permeates the novel and gives it its acerbic bite.

As Emma so keenly observed in the Gwyneth Paltrow version, your quaint small English town is your world, and though it may seem diminutive, it is as lush and large as you make it. Even the most remedial gossip can seem world-ending in a bombastically melodramatic way, to the delight of viewers who spot the irony.

2020 VERSION: INTIMACY

Emma: 7 Reasons The 2020 Movie Is Better Than The Gwyneth Paltrow Version (& 3 Paltrow's Is Better)
Emma: 7 Reasons The 2020 Movie Is Better Than The Gwyneth Paltrow Version (& 3 Paltrow’s Is Better)

There are scenes in the 2020 version that didn’t appear in the 1996 version or the book – scenes where characters are far removed from the hustle and bustle of the social gatherings, and simply going about their daily lives. They’re often found alone, assembling themselves, and the viewer is given an inside peek at their existence.

There are even moments of intimacy, where the viewer seems to be invited into sequences between characters that seem wholly private. There’s nudity, and tender moments, which aren’t used to be shocking as much as they are to be revealing and relatable. Not all is frivolity in Emma’s world, and much of the social interactions between characters are intended to be performative.

PALTROW’S VERSION: SENTIMENTALITY

Emma: 7 Reasons The 2020 Movie Is Better Than The Gwyneth Paltrow Version (& 3 Paltrow's Is Better)
Emma: 7 Reasons The 2020 Movie Is Better Than The Gwyneth Paltrow Version (& 3 Paltrow’s Is Better)

There is an earnestness to the 1996 version that the bitingly droll 2020 version doesn’t quite have, and its sentimentality makes it feel much more like a fairy tale in that way. Gwyneth Paltrow’s Emma is kindly, and even Mr. Churchill cannot be thought of as a rake when played by the dashing Ewan McGregor.

The emotional beats made in every scene, including the uproarious scene where Emma crashes into the lake, make the film seem lighter and gayer than its 2020 counterpart. Certainly less mean spirited, and in so doing earns its happy ending, with Mr. Knightly and Emma finally admitting their true feelings.

2020 VERSION: COMEDY & SATIRE

Emma: 7 Reasons The 2020 Movie Is Better Than The Gwyneth Paltrow Version (& 3 Paltrow's Is Better)
Emma: 7 Reasons The 2020 Movie Is Better Than The Gwyneth Paltrow Version (& 3 Paltrow’s Is Better)

Similar to the Wes Anderson film The Grand Budapest Hotel, Emma is full of eccentric characters that are thrust into random situations like spirited marionettes on strings. The Austen novel was always rooted in satire, with much of the author’s best dialogue coming from the verbal sparring and interplay between her characters.

Anya Taylor-Joy as Emma provides an acerbic wit that seems to have a modern eye for millennial smugness, but it fits the material because the novel never seems like it was written over 200 years ago anyway. The comedy is far removed from the dry drawing-room humor of most BBC productions of decades past and is refreshing in its brazenness without being self-congratulatory with its cleverness.

PALTROW’S VERSION: HARRIET

Emma: 7 Reasons The 2020 Movie Is Better Than The Gwyneth Paltrow Version (& 3 Paltrow's Is Better)
Emma: 7 Reasons The 2020 Movie Is Better Than The Gwyneth Paltrow Version (& 3 Paltrow’s Is Better)

Though Toni Collette has become well known for playing dark and gritty roles these days, her skills as a character actress served her well in 1996 when she embodied the light-hearted Harriet, Emma’s protege. She may seem dim to the rules of polite society, but she was never thought of as a cretin.

In the 2020 version, she’s very easy bait because of her mental state, and easy prey for someone like Emma. She doesn’t come off as a character who could end up teaching Emma a thing or two about emotional maturity, unlike the Harriet of the 1996 film who just needed to trust in her own decision-making abilities without Emma’s interference.

2020 VERSION: MR. WOODHOUSE

Emma: 7 Reasons The 2020 Movie Is Better Than The Gwyneth Paltrow Version (& 3 Paltrow's Is Better)
Emma: 7 Reasons The 2020 Movie Is Better Than The Gwyneth Paltrow Version (& 3 Paltrow’s Is Better)

The character of Mr. Woodhouse has several amusing moments in the Emma novel, which translated more or less to the 1996 version, but that version did not benefit from the scene-chewing eccentricity of Bill Nighy, who is able to make a character feel like a fully realized presence despite having very little screen time.

Given he has less screen time, Bill Nighy (despite having professed to never reading any Austen books) makes the most of his character’s several quirks, amplifying them whenever he’s in a scene to work very congruently with the biting satire of the rest of the ensemble cast. He is wholly memorable in a previously unmemorable role.

2020 VERSION: EMMA

Emma: 7 Reasons The 2020 Movie Is Better Than The Gwyneth Paltrow Version (& 3 Paltrow's Is Better)
Emma: 7 Reasons The 2020 Movie Is Better Than The Gwyneth Paltrow Version (& 3 Paltrow’s Is Better)

Gwyneth Paltrow portrayed Emma with a cherubic sincerity despite the fact that Jane Austen herself set out to write a heroine very different than any of her others. Emma is supposed to be “unlikable” by Austen’s own admitting, and it seemed as though Paltrow struggled with being considered anything but angelic.

Anya Taylor-Joy, by contrast, portrays Emma as the disconnected snob that she is, and perhaps too much so in the beginning. But it’s her performance that gets the biggest payout, as Emma’s character goes through the most significant transformation. By the end, she’s completely different than she was at the beginning.

2020 VERSION: MR. KNIGHTLEY

Emma: 7 Reasons The 2020 Movie Is Better Than The Gwyneth Paltrow Version (& 3 Paltrow's Is Better)
Emma: 7 Reasons The 2020 Movie Is Better Than The Gwyneth Paltrow Version (& 3 Paltrow’s Is Better)

Let it be known that in Jane Austen’s novel, Mr. Knightley is 16 years older than Emma. He’s more friendly with her father than he is with her, and though they get on well, the relationship is more in keeping with the time period in which Austen wrote than the modern-day. That being said, in both the 2020 version and the 1996 version, Mr. Knightley appears to be only a few years older than Emma.

Jeremy Northam’s Mr. Knightley remains two-dimensional, whereas Johnny Flynn’s 2020 version provides softer masculinity to the role, which makes more sense considering over time it’s he who chides Emma for her own misogynistic views and gets her to change her mind about male and female relations. He also manages to make Mr. Knightley funny and expresses a whole myriad of emotions.

2020 VERSION: THE NOSE BLEED

Emma: 7 Reasons The 2020 Movie Is Better Than The Gwyneth Paltrow Version (& 3 Paltrow's Is Better)
Emma: 7 Reasons The 2020 Movie Is Better Than The Gwyneth Paltrow Version (& 3 Paltrow’s Is Better)

There are many ways the 2020 version subverts expectations, but perhaps the best way it accomplishes this is with the final scene. Emma and Mr. Knightly have finally declared their affections for one another, and viewers expectantly wait for the epic kiss on the hilltop, when suddenly Emma has an epic nosebleed instead.

It may seem completely off-base, but we feel Austen would have loved this approach, and probably would have written it in herself if her audience was ready for it. It demonstrates that romance is awkward and clumsy, like change, but if Emma can handle it, she’s ready to become a better person.

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Emma. (2020) on DVD For Sale

Emma. (2020) on DVD

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Bride of Chucky: How a Baffling Retcon Makes the First Three Movies Pointless

Bride of Chucky revived the flagging Child’s Play franchise by going the more comedic route, but a retcon it makes to the lore is downright baffling.

Bride of Chucky revived the flagging Child’s Play franchise by going the more comedic route, but a retcon it makes to the lore is downright baffling. It’s well-known at this point that the original Child’s Play movie, and in fact the entire series, has been the brainchild of one man: Don Mancini. Mancini has written the scripts for all seven movies in the main Chucky continuity, and directed Seed of Chucky, Curse of Chucky, and Cult of Chucky. In other words, Chucky fans have a lot to thank Mancini for creating.

While Chucky may not be quite as iconic as a Freddy Krueger, Jason Voorhees, or Michael Myers, the former Lakeshore Strangler still has a legion of loyal fans who look forward to each new installment in his tale. Chucky will soon migrate to the small screen, via a TV show on Syfy that sees Brad Dourif reprise his role as Chucky and Mancini write and direct the pilot. Mancini will also oversee things as executive producer.

Chucky also got a remake in 2019, but that seems to have been quickly forgotten, and many fans were angry about it being made against Mancini’s wishes. While Chucky lives on though, and is still a great source of entertainment, one particular plot turn in 1998’s Bride of Chucky remains hard to explain in the context of the franchise.

Bride Of Chucky: How A Baffling Retcon Makes The First Three Movies Pointless

Bride of Chucky: How a Baffling Retcon Makes the First Three Movies Pointless
Bride of Chucky: How a Baffling Retcon Makes the First Three Movies Pointless

In Bride of Chucky, after Chucky’s ex-girlfriend Tiffany resurrects him using voodoo, and an angry Chucky later kills Tiffany and transfers her soul into another doll, the two are left wanting to be back in human bodies. Chucky reveals that to do that, the duo will need to find a way to Chucky’s human remains and retrieve an amulet called the Heart of Damballa. It would appear that the Heart is only needed for transfer into a human vessel, not a doll, so that seems to track. The problem is, this revelation makes no sense.

For one, Charles Lee Ray is not shown to have anything remotely like the Heart of Damballa on him during the original Child’s Play. That could be excused, if not for the fact that the first three films established a clear rule. Each time Chucky got a new doll body, he had a limited time to transfer his soul into the first human who learned he was alive. If he failed, he’d be trapped as a doll. Thus, Chucky spends the first three films trying to trap Andy – or later Tyler – long enough so they can play “hide the soul.”

If Chucky knew about the Heart of Damballa for the whole franchise, which seemingly allows him to transfer his soul into any person after any length of time, it makes absolutely no sense why he spends three movies chasing around children. Chucky could’ve found a way to get to his body, or better yet, taken the Heart off his corpse in the toy store after first making the switch. He then could’ve used it to transfer into anyone he could briefly incapacitate, anywhere, whenever. While this odd logic gap could be explained by having multiple writers involved, the fact that Mancini contradicted his own precedent so brazenly is a bit of a head-scratcher.

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Chucky Complete 7-Movie Collection on DVD For Sale

Chucky Complete 7-Movie Collection on DVD

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Charlie Brown: Every Peanuts Seasonal Special, Ranked

Charlie Brown is well regarded for its seasonal specials, but which of the Peanuts’ holiday stories are the best?

There are many installments in the filmed Peanuts universe. While the comic strips provided slice-of-life antics from the kids, Snoopy, and Woodstock, the television specials probed deeper into the worlds of history classes and baseball games experienced by the Charles Schulz characters.

Additionally, Schulz ensured that the beloved Peanuts characters would be with fans the whole year ’round, thanks to a slew of seasonal specials that make merry each time of year that they air. Each has, at the very least, some merit to them. However, as rankings tend to show, it can be hard to top the classics. Even with Christmas over, there are plenty of holidays left to anticipate the return of Charlie Brown for.

Charlie Brown’s Christmas Tales

Charlie Brown: Every Peanuts Seasonal Special, Ranked
Charlie Brown: Every Peanuts Seasonal Special, Ranked

This Christmas special from the Peanuts gang is a collection of vignettes, starring Snoopy, Linus, Sally, Lucy, and Charlie Brown.

While it gets points for being Schulz’s only posthumous writing credit, it hardly seems to be of a piece with his wider Peanuts sensibility. Instead, it’s a mishmash of merchandising with segments so short, none of them seem to resonate at all.

It’s Christmastime Again, Charlie Brown

Charlie Brown: Every Peanuts Seasonal Special, Ranked
Charlie Brown: Every Peanuts Seasonal Special, Ranked

It’s Christmastime Again,A decade before Charlie Brown’s Christmas Tales aired, the Peanuts revisited the winter well with It’s Christmastime Again, Charlie Brown.

While it utterly fails to recapture the magic of the original 1965 special, it does at least share Peanuts DNA with those original comic strips. The vignettes contained a narrative through line similar to A Christmas Story and that’s about as much as could be asked by the 1990s.

It’s Arbor Day, Charlie Brown

Charlie Brown: Every Peanuts Seasonal Special, Ranked
Charlie Brown: Every Peanuts Seasonal Special, Ranked

When the Peanuts gang celebrated Arbor Day, it was clear that they weren’t just scraping the bottom of the barrel; they were splintering it in myriad directions.

Who gathers around the television to watch an Arbor Day festivity? With a droll story of a holiday report and a tree that encroaches on a baseball diamond, It’s Arbor Day, Charlie Brown never quite became a perennial classic.

I Want A Dog For Christmas, Charlie Brown

It’s Always Sunny In Philadelphia: 10 Best Dee Episodes
Charlie Brown: Every Peanuts Seasonal Special, Ranked

Clearly, the Christmas season is rich with ore for the creative lineage of the Peanuts to mine. Surprisingly, the latest attempt at crafting a new classic for the yuletide season, I Want a Dog for Christmas, Charlie Brown was the most successful.

Perhaps because it never pretended to be on par with the original or perhaps because its forty-minute running time gave it room to unfold satisfyingly, this special is a cut above some of the earlier holiday dreck. Plus, it features cameos from the greater Snoopy lore.

A Charlie Brown Valentine

Charlie Brown: Every Peanuts Seasonal Special, Ranked
Charlie Brown: Every Peanuts Seasonal Special, Ranked

If one is not a Peanuts scholar, it might be easy to confuse the two Valentine’s Day specials aired about Charlie Brown and his neurotic friends. This one was the later one, though, airing in 2002.

It was actually the first Peanuts special to air in eight years at the time. Unfortunately, it didn’t do much to excite the fans of the characters who’d been waiting to see them on screen again. Its convoluted, yet cliched narrative did not work to be a Peanuts classic.

It’s The Easter Beagle, Charlie Brown

Charlie Brown: Every Peanuts Seasonal Special, Ranked
Charlie Brown: Every Peanuts Seasonal Special, Ranked

The gang’s first foray into the Easter holiday was clearly trying its best to be a mid-range hit in the same vein as It’s the Great Pumpkin. However, It’s the Easter Beagle was not nearly as delightful as its predecessor.

Yes, it has some bright moments, with Snoopy’s colorful frolic standing out most vividly. However, it’s mostly just a rehash of a number of plot points handled better by previous Peanuts specials, like Linus’ ceaseless faith and Charlie Brown’s unfortunate bullying.

Happy New Year, Charlie Brown!

Charlie Brown: Every Peanuts Seasonal Special, Ranked
Charlie Brown: Every Peanuts Seasonal Special, Ranked

Happy New Year, Charlie Brown! definitely seems like a whole lot of nonsense at first, but it does have some charm. It takes a bold creator to deliver a holiday special about parties and make it about War and Peace instead, after all.

While the adult singing voices in this special can be a bit jarring, they’re ultimately a nostalgic reminder of December’s denouement and how comforting it can be. Unless one has to read Leo Tolstoy during it.

Be My Valentine, Charlie Brown

Charlie Brown: Every Peanuts Seasonal Special, Ranked
Charlie Brown: Every Peanuts Seasonal Special, Ranked

In the original 1975 Valentine’s Day special, Charlie Brown and Linus are just two lovestruck best friends navigating an unforgiving holiday.

It may be a mid-tier special, but it’s still an altogether memorable one and certainly better fare than some specials that celebrate Arbor Day. It benefits from the twinkling Vince Guaraldi and some of the more pensive moments in the Peanuts canon.

A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving

Charlie Brown: Every Peanuts Seasonal Special, Ranked
Charlie Brown: Every Peanuts Seasonal Special, Ranked

Like the New Year’s Eve special, A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving is built on nonsense. Snoopy and Woodstock fight off lawn chairs while cooking an entire dinner (consisting of toast, popcorn, and jelly beans, among other delectable treats). Yet, Peppermint Patty is still ungrateful, despite the fact that she invited herself over to the Brown house.

It’s a tough look for Peppermint Patty, but the special still comes together nicely: with a discordant, cacophonous group rendition of “Over the River and Through the Woods.” It’s what Thanksgiving is all about.

It’s The Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown

Charlie Brown: Every Peanuts Seasonal Special, Ranked
Charlie Brown: Every Peanuts Seasonal Special, Ranked

It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown has remained a staple of the Halloween season because it is ultimately accessible and beloved by children of all ages.

After all, it features dense vocabulary and allusions to World War I. What do kids love more than that? Nothing says the spookiest time of the year like a dog reliving his past manufactured trauma as a World War I flying ace.

A Charlie Brown Christmas

Charlie Brown: Every Peanuts Seasonal Special, Ranked
Charlie Brown: Every Peanuts Seasonal Special, Ranked

In all sincerity, It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown really is a ton of fun and it has some great comedic moments. A Charlie Brown Christmas, though, has laugh-out-loud jokes and the utmost sincerity, on par with that of the scraggly Christmas tree Charlie Brown adopts as his own.

There may be no greater moment in Peanuts history than when Charlie Brown wordlessly steps from the auditorium and observes the Christmas star twinkling above. A Charlie Brown Christmas isn’t just the best seasonal special from the Peanuts; it might be the best half-hour in the history of television.

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A Charlie Brown Christmas 50th Anniversary Deluxe Edition on DVD For Sale

A Charlie Brown Christmas 50th Anniversary Deluxe Edition on DVD

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5 Reasons Why ‘Frozen II’ Did Worse On IMDb Than The Original (& 5 Why It Shouldn’t)

5 Reasons Why ‘Frozen II’ Did Worse On IMDb Than The Original (& 5 Why It Shouldn’t)

Frozen II was released at the end of 2019, quite a few years after the original. Fans were obsessed with the tale from the first film and had hoped to be as inspired by the second. Some thought it was a hit, while others were less than enthused with the outcome.

IMDb users gave the first film a rating of 7.4, while the second film only received a 7.0. It was disappointing to see this outcome, but there were several reasons that could sway an opinion either way. Keep reading to learn about five reasons why Frozen II did worse on IMDb than the original, and five why it shouldn’t!

Why It Did Worse: The Songs Weren’t Great

5 Reasons Why 'Frozen II' Did Worse On IMDb Than The Original (& 5 Why It Shouldn't)
5 Reasons Why ‘Frozen II’ Did Worse On IMDb Than The Original (& 5 Why It Shouldn’t)

The original film had so many great songs that fans were singing from the rooftops, but this film didn’t inspire the same outcome. The songs in the second film were still good and flowed with the film, although they lacked inspiration.

Some even seemed to be thrown in there nonchalantly, while the songs from the original film had fans of all ages buying the album from the store. It also seemed like they threw a lot of songs at fans right in the beginning, rather than focusing on dialogue to capture the attention of fans.

Why It Shouldn’t: More Magic Is Introduced

5 Reasons Why 'Frozen II' Did Worse On IMDb Than The Original (& 5 Why It Shouldn't)
5 Reasons Why ‘Frozen II’ Did Worse On IMDb Than The Original (& 5 Why It Shouldn’t)

One of the best things about this film is the addition of more magic. Elsa expands upon her own powers as she shows her ability to wield it in a way that makes her very powerful. Fans were also given new fantastical creatures like a fiery gecko and a horse made of water.

This element was something that was kept more or less hidden in the first film, while the second opened it up to exploration.

Why It Did Worse: The Plot Was Subpar

5 Reasons Why 'Frozen II' Did Worse On IMDb Than The Original (& 5 Why It Shouldn't)
5 Reasons Why ‘Frozen II’ Did Worse On IMDb Than The Original (& 5 Why It Shouldn’t)

The plot seemed to jump all over the place throughout the film as so many different themes seemed to be thrown into the final product. It took a turn for the worse when everyone became separated and the scenes had to jump from one character to another.

The film seemed to lose some of its magic when this happened, especially with its younger audience, as they did their best to stay enthused with the movie.

Why It Shouldn’t: It Covers Difficult Topics

5 Reasons Why 'Frozen II' Did Worse On IMDb Than The Original (& 5 Why It Shouldn't)
5 Reasons Why ‘Frozen II’ Did Worse On IMDb Than The Original (& 5 Why It Shouldn’t)

The first film uncovered topics like love and secrets, while the second film dove deeper into more difficult topics. The first is how the girls deal with the loss of their mother at a young age and cope with this throughout the film. It also covers more modern-day love, as Kristoff asks before swooping in to save the day, and isn’t afraid to show his own vulnerability.

Fans also see the addition of different cultures, as well as the issues that come with colonialism. The film leans toward a maturity that wasn’t seen in the first, and many would argue that it is a better film because of it.

Why It Did Worse: Fans Knew The Deaths Weren’t Real

5 Reasons Why 'Frozen II' Did Worse On IMDb Than The Original (& 5 Why It Shouldn't)
5 Reasons Why ‘Frozen II’ Did Worse On IMDb Than The Original (& 5 Why It Shouldn’t)

Fans watched as Olaf melted and Elsa turned to ice, but it didn’t encourage any sad emotions. Fans should have been bawling their eyes out as they watched two of their favorite characters meet their end, but instead, they stared blank-faced at the screen while awaiting their return.

It was supposed to be a shocking moment that rocked their world, and it fell flat because everyone knew that they could never kill off these two characters without ruining the franchise.

Why It Shouldn’t: The Animations Were Taken To New Heights

5 Reasons Why 'Frozen II' Did Worse On IMDb Than The Original (& 5 Why It Shouldn't)
5 Reasons Why ‘Frozen II’ Did Worse On IMDb Than The Original (& 5 Why It Shouldn’t)

A six-year span rests between the first and second films, giving technology time to advance. The finer details hit the mark and the overall look had a cleaner presentation than that of the first film.

Fans were in awe of the graphics the moment the movie started, and this is what stuck in the memories of it’s fans.

Why It Did Worse: It Started Out Slow

5 Reasons Why 'Frozen II' Did Worse On IMDb Than The Original (& 5 Why It Shouldn't)
5 Reasons Why ‘Frozen II’ Did Worse On IMDb Than The Original (& 5 Why It Shouldn’t)

The film began with lots of singing and backstory that bored the fans to death. Some even debated bailing on the film within the first half-hour as they waited for something exciting to happen.

It dragged on at points where it should have been pummeling viewers with action. Fans had expected to be blown away, and the beginning inspired the opposite effect.

Why It Shouldn’t: Fans Feel A Deeper Connection To Olaf

5 Reasons Why 'Frozen II' Did Worse On IMDb Than The Original (& 5 Why It Shouldn't)
5 Reasons Why ‘Frozen II’ Did Worse On IMDb Than The Original (& 5 Why It Shouldn’t)

Olaf was a fan favorite in the first, but he was even more popular the second time around. He was as comedic as he was in the first, but the writers also made fans feel something deeper for this character.

The song where he runs from the spirits in the woods is unforgettable, and the moments that he shares with Anna are magical. It focuses more on his own personal qualities, rather than making him a comedic relief as he was in the original.

Why It Did Worse: The New Characters Weren’t Special

5 Reasons Why 'Frozen II' Did Worse On IMDb Than The Original (& 5 Why It Shouldn't)
5 Reasons Why ‘Frozen II’ Did Worse On IMDb Than The Original (& 5 Why It Shouldn’t)

The original film had fans holding the newly introduced characters close to their hearts, while the second had fans easily forgetting their names.

The members of the Northuldra tribe should have been at the front of fans’ minds, but instead, the film left it hard to even picture their faces. These people should have been at the forefront, yet somehow Disney managed to push them into the background without a second thought.

Why It Shouldn’t: The Sisters Find Their Own Way

5 Reasons Why 'Frozen II' Did Worse On IMDb Than The Original (& 5 Why It Shouldn't)
5 Reasons Why ‘Frozen II’ Did Worse On IMDb Than The Original (& 5 Why It Shouldn’t)

The first film sent Anna on an adventure to find her sister, while the second film sent them each their own way. Fans watched as Elsa was literally frozen and it was left up to Anna to save the day.

The ending also solidified this fact as Anna became the queen of the kingdom, while Elsa decided her calling was to live in the woods with the native people.

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Babylon 5: 10 Hidden Details About The Costumes You Didn’t Know

Babylon 5 isn’t well-remembered today, but dedicated sci-fi fans may be interested to know that the series’ costume designs hid a ton of secrets.

Running for five seasons, the space opera Babylon 5 is a classic throwback to the 1990s. The series mostly deals with the drama around human military officials and alien diplomats aboard the spaceship known as Babylon 5. Apart from its themes of authoritarianism versus free will and order versus chaos, visual effects, and prosthetics, the show was also reputed for its costume design at the time.

With Ann Bruce Aling serving as the costume designer, there are a few hidden details and facts that viewers might have forgotten about the costumes in Babylon 5. Here, we count down 10 such details about Babylon 5’s costumes.

Ostrich Leather & Materials From The 40s

Babylon 5: 10 Hidden Details About The Costumes You Didn't Know
Babylon 5: 10 Hidden Details About The Costumes You Didn’t Know

Aling’s choice of costumes for the show was varied. Even though it was set in a futuristic setting, she tried making use of natural materials for the costumes whenever she can. For instance, in the body armor of the Narn race, the breastplate was made out of padded ostrich leather over a black cotton jumpsuit.

Apart from natural materials, Aling was also influenced by vintage clothing sometimes. She has combined the costumes with even silk or rayon brocades from the 1930s and 1940s. This helps in giving the costumes a look that has developed from various cultures. The Centauri outfits were also influenced by pre-Napoleonic costumes.

A Helmet Worth Three Grand

Babylon 5: 10 Hidden Details About The Costumes You Didn't Know
Babylon 5: 10 Hidden Details About The Costumes You Didn’t Know

The costumes that the B5 Starfury fighter pilots don in the series were heavy, both physically and in terms of the show’s budget. This was because this costume was a liquid-cooled space suit.

These suits had to be cooled down to reduce their weight, as they were terribly heavy. The suits are usually used by astronauts in harsh conditions. The one used in Babylon 5 is so intricate that even their helmets cost to about three thousand dollars. The show clearly kept a big chunk of its budget for the costume department.

Changing Londo’s Colors

Babylon 5: 10 Hidden Details About The Costumes You Didn't Know
Babylon 5: 10 Hidden Details About The Costumes You Didn’t Know

Ambassador Londo Mollari was a supporting character in the show who has been subjected to a significant change of character by the writers with each new season. Earlier in the series, he was just a stock character for comic relief, but, later on, he became a man of honor and a patriot for the Centauri.

To show this change, even his clothes started acquiring a more serious tone. Initially, the character used to sport a purple coat which later became dark blue to express a darker tone for the character. Even his waistcoats became simple later on, rather than the usual bright patterned ones.

Ruined Costumes For Destitute Characters

Babylon 5: 10 Hidden Details About The Costumes You Didn't Know
Babylon 5: 10 Hidden Details About The Costumes You Didn’t Know

The cast members or the extras who played destitute characters from the Down Below wore costumes that were ruined on purpose to give them a ragged an unkempt look. Various methods were used to achieve the look.

These include bleaching, sanding, and dipping in dye baths. Some even had stage blood applied to them. Surely, Babylon 5 paid acute attention to detail to even the unprivileged extras.

The Costume Department Made Occasional Cameos

Babylon 5: 10 Hidden Details About The Costumes You Didn't Know
Babylon 5: 10 Hidden Details About The Costumes You Didn’t Know

There were onscreen cameos in the series, often by its own crew members including the costume designers. For instance, the season four episode “Atonement” featured a cameo by the costume supervisors as Minbari women fitting Zack Allan for his new uniform when he gets promoted to head of security. Additionally, there was also an inside joke in this scene.

Allan complains about the fitting of the suit. Pissed off by his complaints, costume supervisor Kim Holly even stabs him with a needle. This was a reference to the old security costumes used in the show, which were tough to work with because of their combination of leather and wool.

Customized Clothes For Human Civilians

Babylon 5: 10 Hidden Details About The Costumes You Didn't Know
Babylon 5: 10 Hidden Details About The Costumes You Didn’t Know

Like the destitute characters, actors and extras playing human civilians often wore normal clothes that were then customized. The garments were purchase from usual retail stores and then altered accordingly. As Aling puts it herself, “we shop everywhere. We shop at fabric stores where the general public shops.”

To still give the look of new-wave or future fashion suiting the show’s timeline, lapels were removed from jackets and shirts, and their closures were also rearranged. A more fashionable “couture” look was adapted for the female characters. A significant example of this is the suits worn by the character Talia Winters. Aling said that these were designed within an inch of their life!

Ceremonial Dresses

Babylon 5: 10 Hidden Details About The Costumes You Didn't Know
Babylon 5: 10 Hidden Details About The Costumes You Didn’t Know

In a podcast, Aling revealed that there were ceremonial dresses prepared for the alien species, the relevance of which might have been missed by viewers at times. “You see ceremonial dress already. Minbari celebrations, particularly religious Centauri celebrations, have included opulent orgiastic looks,” she said.

Such religious dresses were also featured heavily amongst the Narn race, including G’Kar’s prayer robe and talus when he practices the faith of G’Quan. “G’Kar, Delenn, and Londo have always had special looks only worn for council meetings and ceremonies.” Aling added.

Costume Emergency

Babylon 5: 10 Hidden Details About The Costumes You Didn't Know
Babylon 5: 10 Hidden Details About The Costumes You Didn’t Know

Ann Bruce Aling has jokingly stated in interviews that she has had costume emergencies almost every half hour while working for the show. By the second season, there were three versions of costumes for the lead characters. One was the final costume, one was for stunt doubles, and another one was an emergency back-up in case of any “coffee spills.”

In some episodes, the actors were allergic to a particular material. For instance, in the Babylon 5 film A Call To Arms, an actor had a wool allergy, so his woolen cape had to be replaced.

Mutual Relationship Between Costumes And Sets

Babylon 5: 10 Hidden Details About The Costumes You Didn't Know
Babylon 5: 10 Hidden Details About The Costumes You Didn’t Know

Often, the production design was changed according to the needs of the costumes. As Aling had a passion for costume history, she intensely studied the histories and cultures of all civilizations and alien races that showrunner J. Michael Straczynski conceptualized.

The costumes would be designed according to the peaceful or warring nature of these races too. For this reason, production designer John Iacovelli worked closely with Aling and they consulted each other for the visuals. The biggest example can be that of the Minbari. As most of the Minbari were dressed in shades of blue and purple, their places of importance also acquired a blue tone.

The Continuing Legacy In Silicon Valley

Babylon 5: 10 Hidden Details About The Costumes You Didn't Know
Babylon 5: 10 Hidden Details About The Costumes You Didn’t Know

The show might still not be that remembered among mainstream sci-fi audiences, as the market is currently saturated with all sorts of sci-fi, but a few shows have offered tributes to Babylon 5’s costumes. It started with the 2009 comedy series Flight Of The Conchords. In a particular episode, the cast members perform a song wearing costumes of the Earthforce military uniform.

In Mike Judge’s Silicon Valley, too, the spiritual trainer Denpok usually sports an intricately designed, striped, multi-colored tunic. On closer observation, one can easily figure out that it’s the very same long coat that the Centauri noble Vir Cotto wears. Hence, at least in costumes, the legacy of this classic space opera lives on.

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